Every Season of Life Matters

I’ve lived in four season climate my entire life. Sometimes the seasons seem a bit confused. But the reality is they come and go in varying degrees. Some people feel because of this variation that seasons don’t matter. This sentiment should not carry over into our lives, and yet it seems to.

We go through seasons in our lives. Great seasons and terrible seasons, chaotic seasons and calm seasons. No matter the season the expected and unexpected matter, and it matters that we understand that. Embracing the season may not be easy, but it is important all the time. Our circumstances are not a life sentence, and we need to embrace the idea that our circumstances are opportunities. How do we overcome the tension of difficult seasons and welcome opportunities for influence? First is the awareness that all seasons are important, these things can happen.

Nature’s seasons teach us about ourselves. In winter we go inward and do our internal work, reflection, hibernation, and planning brings self-reflection. Then spring comes and offers a chance for renew, learning, opportunity and progressive thinking, an opportunity for learning. The summer arrives while we steep and marinate in our new growth, rewards, celebration and fulfillment, happiness. Finally, fall comes, and we shed what no longer serves us, for survival, mistakes and problems, pain.

In summer you’ll find yourself undertaking these activities: Networking, traveling, leisure, accomplishing goals, taking risks, proactive action, expanding your comfort zone, thinking optimistically. In summer you may be experiencing these emotions: excitement, passion, euphoria, courage, confidence. The evolution of summer requires real plans, preparation, solid choices and decisions, prolonged self-reflection, capitalizing on the right opportunities.

What impact has the summers had on your life?
What have summers taught you about yourself and others?
How have summers transformed your personality?

In autumn you’ll find yourself undertaking these activities: avoiding responsibility, contracting your comfort zone, hesitating, thinking unrealistically, ineffectively and pessimistically. In summer you may be experiencing these emotions: anger, anxiety, frustration, stress, disappointment and overwhelm. The evolution of autumn requires certain factors that come into play that naturally enable us to transition through this phase like ineffective decision-making, failure to capitalize on opportunities, ignorance, mistakes stemming from ineffective thinking and mistakes originating from limiting habits of behavior.

What impact have autumns had on my life?
What have autumns taught me about myself and others?
How has autumn so transformed my personality?

In winter you’ll find yourself undertaking these activities: time for finding inner peace and solitude, time for bonding with family, friends and loved ones, time for journaling thoughts and feelings, time for thinking critically, realistically, problematically and thoughtfully about life. In winter you may be experiencing these emotions: guilt, fear, relief, grief, hope. The evolution of winter includes these factors of lack of emotional intelligence, reactive behavior to losses and uncontrolled circumstances, ineffective choices, habits, and thoughts.

What impact has the winters had on my life?
What have winters taught me about myself, life and others?
How have winters transformed my personality?

In spring you’ll find yourself undertaking these activities: developing new skills, habits, and social contacts; altering personal mindset; expanding knowledge, options, and opportunities; setting goals; thinking strategically, tactically and insightfully. In spring you may be experiencing these emotions: love, trust, joy, gratitude, appreciation. The evolution of spring of enhanced self-belief, increased self-confidence, solid reflection time that enables you to clarify what you want most in life are factors that come into play that naturally allow us to transition to this phase of life.

What impact have the springs had on my life?
What have springs taught me about myself, life and others?
How have springs transformed my personality?

The seasons of life are always changing as a result of the choices and decisions that we make on a daily basis. The life seasons transition naturally from one phase to another because of they are simply a reflection of our human nature. Our seasons of life are temporary just as nature’s seasons are. The joy you feel during summer will not last forever, the length of time it takes us to process through each season is simply a reflection of our state-of-mind a reflection of our ability to adapt to the conditions and circumstances we find ourselves in. The seasons of life are there to teach us lessons about ourselves and our lives. They are there to help us grow emotionally, physically and socially. When we succeed we celebrate. When we fail, we complain and blame, and eventually find our way into contemplation of who we are, what we want and how we would like to show up in the world. All of this shapes our character, paints the canvas of our life as we evolve. We naturally create and transition between the four seasons of life as a result of our responses and reactions to people, events, and circumstances. How we respond to our environment will directly influence what we get back from our environment whether they are problems or opportunities.

Yoga Therapy helps you build tools that allow you to flow through these seasons. It teaches you how to support, love and forgive as you go through these seasons of life. So you can ride the waves of life seasons with grace.

Which season are you currently transitioning though at this very moment?
How have the seasons shaped your character?
Have the seasons strengthened your character?
How have seasons of life enriched your experience of life?

The seasons of life don’t necessarily cycle from summer to autumn to winter to spring and then start over again. They transition any-which-way depending on the emotional choices and decisions we make on a daily basis.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Every Person is Different But Every Person Matters | Add Comments Here »


Chronic Pelvic Pain Evidence Informed Protocol

Abstract

Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) is pain in the area below the belly button and between the hips lasting six months or longer. Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome can be its own condition or symptom of another disease. CPPS is a complicated situation requiring a combination approach to healing. Treatment is symptomatic abortive therapy to reduce acute exacerbations. There is currently little research on yoga therapy and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Overall research on chronic pelvic pain syndrome appears to be lacking rigger. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a problem for health care providers because it is misunderstood and poorly managed. CPPS has an unclear etiology, complex natural history and poor response to treatment plans of care. Arnold Kegel, in 1950 was the first author to talk about PFM (Pelvic Floor Muscles) and have been recommended for some time. In 1963 Jones suggested that anatomic characteristics could influence the performance of PFM. In 1984 the introduction of biofeedback provided confirmation of the use of Kegel exercise in changing PFM function. In the 1990’s randomized control trials began related to PFM training. CPPS is a public health problem for women throughout the developed world.

Introduction

One in seven women suffer from CPPS outpatient visits in the United States for Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) is estimated at $881.5 million per year for women between the ages of eighteen to fifty (Mathias, 1996).  Similar to other chronic pain conditions CPPS may lead to prolonged suffering and a lifetime of therapies while affecting their personal and professional relationships and leading to loss of employment or disability. To optimally manage this condition a variety of health care professionals are needed. A CPPS patient may see a gynecologist, gastroenterologist, urogynecologist, physiatrist, and a physical therapist. It is suggested that the patient and their family be educated on the multifactorial approach to chronic pain. Patients should avoid stressful situations and poor posture. It is suggested that exercise, good sleep hygiene, balanced meals, biofeedback and relaxation techniques may be beneficial to CPPS (Singh, 2015).

The Literature Review

Having a good working relationship between the clinician and patient is a necessity due to the compounding nature of CPPS. A treatment plan should be tailored to the individual with a goal to reduce symptoms and improve the quality of life. While managing the pain using a contemporary approach of both psychological and physical therapy is needed, if a particular cause is found treating this condition as well. The complexity of the pelvis and the anatomical proximity of pelvic visceral means that symptoms frequently overlap traditional medical specialties, leading to diagnostic delay (Vincent, 2008).  Inadequate treatment happens to twenty-five percent of women and often after three to four years they still do not have a diagnosis. During this time these women saw a forty-five percent productivity reduction at work.  CPPS can present anywhere along a spectrum of organ-specific to regional to systematic pain (Vincent, 2008).

CPPS pain symptoms can range from mild to annoying to severe where the patient is missing work, cannot sleep and cannot exercise. Standing for extended periods of time may intensify symptoms; symptoms may be relieved by lying down. Some symptoms that may accompany CPPS are severe and cover a broad range of constant pain, intermittent pain, dull aching pain, sharp pains or cramping, pressure or heaviness deep in the pelvis, pain during intercourse, pain while having a bowel movement or urinating, pain when you sit for extended periods of time.  There is no gold standard diagnostic test for CPPS; it is a diagnosis of exclusion (Sherkhane, 2013). Causes for this condition are complex as there may not be one single cause but many amongst a wide range of conditions including reproductive, GI, urologic and neuromuscular disorders. Diagnosis for CPPS is usually a process of elimination. A detailed past health history, family history, journal of pain and symptoms, pelvic exam, lab tests (infection, blood count cells and UTI), ultrasound, x-rays, CT scans, musculoskeletal (piriformis syndrome, dysfunction of obturator muscle or fascial, herniated disc, dysfunction of psoas or flexion abduction and external rotation)  and MRI’s (Neis, 2009).  What women want out of a CPPS consultation is personal care, to be understood, to be taken seriously, explanation and reassurance (Vincent, 2008).

The pharmacology of CPPS generally starts with pain relievers such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen. It is common to prescribe hormone treatment (birth control) and/or antibiotics (tizanidine) and/or antidepressants (doxepin, desipramine, protriptyline, buspirone).  Other therapies prescribed are physical therapy (stretching, massage, relaxation techniques, TENS-transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation), Neurostimulation (spinal cord stimulation), trigger point injections, psychotherapy (working on root cause cognitive behavioral therapy), biofeedback, acupuncture, meditation and deep breathing. If surgery is an option the most popular surgeries used are laparoscopy and hysterectomy. Other surgery procedures may be presacral neurectomy (superior hypogastric plexus excision), paracervical denervation (laparoscopic uterine nerve ablation) and uterovaginal ganglion excision (inferior hypogastric plexus excision) (Singh, 2015).  Tizanidine is not a conventional method; the theory is that it may provide improved inhibitory function in the central nervous system. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) such as Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft are commonly prescribed to CPPS patients (Singh, 2015).

Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function is a group of muscles and connective tissue that extends as a sling across the base of the pelvis (medical dictionary). It is comprised of two layers, the superficial perineal muscles and the deep pelvic diaphragm providing support for the pelvic organs, the bladder and elements of the spine.  Stiff muscle fibers have a decreased ability to generate power. Overactive pelvic floor muscle (OPFM), experience muscular weakness and early time-to-fatigue. PFM have a higher percentage of slow fibers to maintain its tone and contraction, except during voiding.  Alternative methods, such as Pilates and Yoga may be an effective tool to improve the strength of the body core musculature (Marques, 2010).

Comorbidities for CPPS are depression. The association between abuse, psychological morbidity, pathology, and CPPS are sufficiently consistent and suggest that they may well be causally related (Latthe, 2006).  CPPS is challenging treatment strategies most successfully if they are undertaken in a broader scope of an integrated care model (Engeler, 2013).

 

Pancamaya Model

Yoga therapy can be used as a self-treatment tool for CPPS.

Annamaya Kosha- Muscle guarding is a sign of a tight pelvic floor and is a maladaptive self-protection process that leads to injury and increased pain. Nerve pain leads to muscle atrophy which may cause less blood flow. The diaphragm works in coordination with the pelvic floor. Think of the autonomic nervous system as yin and yang. The sympathetic nervous system is our flight, fight, and freeze pain is overactive here as our run from the bear chemicals is in overdrive.  The parasympathetic nervous system is our rest, and digest and our chill out chemicals are working. Vigorous yoga with lots of sun salutations and lunging is not a good fit for CPPS. A treatment plan using gentle and restorative yoga, while using language on letting go,  and allowing the nervous system to relax is more efficient.

Pranamaya Kosha- Three part breath and letting go breath, works well with this condition. Shallow breathing deprives organs, and muscles of oxygen and is a common trait in those suffering from chronic pain thus the yoga therapist can guide the patient into conscious pranayama. There is a decrease in Apana vayu energy along with chakras one, two and three. Focusing on expelling exhalation and what is not needed, grounding and cleansing to support the need for becoming calm and rooted.

Manomaya Kosha- Starting with tamas which is a dull mind that is hiding awareness, fear interprets experience and hinders self-inquiry and bringing chakras one and two into balance (imbalance, disorder, anxiety, inactive). Rajas will eventually happen as anger, anxiety, frustration, aggression, and boredom seep in as you balance chakra three.  Grounding meditation while working on survival, emotions/suppression, and breaking powerlessness. Managing the emotions can be done through meditation, chanting, mudra, journaling and so on.

Vijinanamaya Kosha- Discussing ahimsa “do no harm” teaching the patient to not push to discomfort because they will gain more by listening to the boundaries their body is telling them. Learning to parent ourselves through listening to the body and mind with kindness. Ishwara Pranidhana is letting go of control and practicing humility so looking at your yoga practice not as what it can do for you but approaching it as a practice in the spirit of an offering. This niyama is a way for us to listen to our minds and to dissolve the endless agitations that may live there.  Swadhyaya letting go of blame and practicing curiosity this can be looked as self-study that uncovers our strengths. It can also be a way to ruthlessly reveal our weakness such as habit patterns and negative tendencies. While this may be uncomfortable work the grace of it is locating the soft spot and not beating ourselves up for what we perceived as a fatal flaw. Learning to welcome and accept our limitations as we do this we get close enough to ourselves to see the roots of our anger, impatience, and self-loathing and instead meet it with compassion for the conditions that molded the behaviors and beliefs in the first place. Aparigraha is letting go of expectation and practicing letting go or flowing with whatever comes our way it is a way for us to practice letting go of some of the physical, emotional and mental baggage that we amass during our journey. We let go it opens up our energy so that something new can come allowing us to grow. It is cleaning out the clutter physically and emotionally, forgiving ourselves and others, observing nature enabling it to teach us to flow along the journey and to learn about our breathtaking it on and off the mat.

Anandamaya Kosha as you focus on security, self-nourishment and self-empowerment then fear and anxiety are released, inner nourishment increases and clarity arises. Sensations of comfort and bliss can stem from the pelvis while radiance unfolds naturally. An inner peace and harmony are obtained.

Yoga has been found to be effective in reducing pain intensity and improving function; however, studies do not mention the sampling methods used (Sutar, 2016).

Evidence Informed Protocol

A yoga therapist can help by addressing a four process treatment plan creating awareness, releasing and relaxing the PFM, engaging PFM, and using the chakras and koshas (Prosko, 2016).  First address security and survival, then self-nourishment and desire, finally self-empowerment and assertiveness. Poses such as knees to chest, twists, pigeon, child’s, supine butterfly, happy baby, third world squat are a few asana to start.  First teach the client about the bones, muscles, and joints of the pelvis. Creates a foundation on which to build further concepts off and gives us a working language for the workshop. The pelvic floor is the antagonist of breathing muscles and helps with breathing coordination.  Two pubic symphysis joints (PSJ,) note this is not a real joint; it is a fibrous cartilage that doesn’t allow for much movement, two sacroiliac articulations (SA)-real joints between the pelvis and sacrum, the fifth joint is between the sacrum and coccyx. Coccyx can move forward and back and which affects the tension in the pelvic floor muscles. Then move into creating flexibility for the pelvic floor. Many pelvises are tight, so first, we will talk about flexibility. A gripped muscle doesn’t allow strength to take hold which is why flexibility is next. Some asana may be the cow-face pose, pigeon pose, cobbler’s pose, supine pigeon, supported bridge. Develop strength to hold the organs in, to create power to build a strong core. Some asana may be Mountain with a block, chair pose, bridge pose, one-legged bridge, warrior 1,2,3, triangle pose, goddess pose, cat/cow, crescent lunge. Putting it all together and creating a visual picture and felt a sense as a way to embrace the relevance of the pelvic floor.

Discussion

Even though research is scarce for CPPS, it is important that every female who presents to a health professional with pain at whatever age be taken seriously. Validating the experience, managing chronic pain, managing musculoskeletal and psychological secondary consequences must be maintained and is best done within a multidisciplinary setting, will reduce the burden of chronic pelvic pain in women. Chronic pelvic pain is a common disabling condition that has been poorly studied. There is uncertainty about the causes and best treatment (Latthe, 2006). Studies designed with long-term follow-up would be useful in establishing yoga-based intervention as a treatment modality for functional pain disorders.  Soothing pitta imbalances and centering vata imbalances is critical while cultivating a sense of comfort and inner nourishment is an effective antidote for issues of codependency and compulsive behaviors.

 References

Engeler DS, et al. The 2013 EAU Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain: Is Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain a Habit, a Philosophy, or a Science? 10 Years of Development. Eur Urol (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ j.eururo.2013.04.035

Janssen, E. B., Rijkers, A. C., Hoppenbrouwers, K., Meuleman, C., & D’hooghe, T. M. (2013). Prevalence of endometriosis diagnosed by laparoscopy in adolescents with dysmenorrhea or chronic pelvic pain: a systematic review. Human Reproduction Update, 19(5), 570-582. doi:10.1093/humupd/dmt016

Latthe, P. (2006). Factors predisposing women to chronic pelvic pain: systematic review. Bmj,332(7544), 749-755. doi:10.1136/bmj.38748.697465.55

Marques, A., Stothers, L., & Macnab, A. (2010). The status of pelvic floor muscle training for women. Canadian Urological Association Journal,4(6), 419-424. doi:10.5489/cuaj.963

Mathias SD, Kuppermann M, Liberman RF, et al. Chronic pelvic pain: prevalence, healthrelatedquality of life, and economic correlates. Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Mar. 87(3):3217.[Medline].

 

Neis KJ, Neis F. Chronic pelvic pain: cause, diagnosis and therapy from a gynaecologist’s and

an endoscopist’s point of view. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2009 Nov. 25(11):75761.

[Medline].

 

Perineal muscles | definition of perineal muscles by … (n.d.). Retrieved from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/perineal+muscles

Prosko, S. (n.d.). Optimizing Pelvic Floor Health Through Yoga Therapy. Yoga Therapy TodayWinter(2016), 32-48.

Sherkhane, N. R., & Gupta, S. (2013). Ayurvedic Treatment For chronic prostatitis Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: a Randomized Controlled Study. International Journal of Ayurveda and Allied Science,2(3), 52-57. Retrieved March 1, 2017.

Singh, M. K., MD. (2015, January 13). Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women. Retrieved March 9, 2017, from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/258334-overview#a6

Sutar, R., Yadav, S., & Desai, G. (2016). Yoga intervention and functional pain syndromes: a selective review. International Review of Psychiatry,28(3), 316-322. doi:10.1080/09540261.2016.1191448

Vincent, K. (2009). Chronic pelvic pain in women. Postgraduate Medical Journal,85, 24-29.   doi:10.1136/pgmj.2008.073494

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized | Add Comments Here »


Yoga and Ayurveda

 

 

Vata is the carrier, and the colon is its main site in the disease process. When Vata accumulates, it spreads to the blood, bones and other parts of the body. Vata acts primarily through the nervous system through which it flows like an electric current. Yoga therapy can help to calm, center and relax the body. You can do this through a slow asana practice, and keep the breath deep with emphasis on the inhalation. Pitta pushes or provokes, and the small intestine is its main site in the disease process, in which excess acids or toxic pitta accumulates and spreads through the blood to different parts of the body. Pitta acts primarily through the digestive system and the blood as the body’s primary thermogenic power. Yoga therapy can help to chill and relax the body. You can do this by surrendering to your asana practice and keeping the breath relaxed and exhaling through the mouth to relieve heat as needed. Kapha strengthens or resist, and the stomach is its main site in the disease process in which excess mucus accumulates and spread through the blood and lymph to different parts of the body. Kapha primarily acts through the plasma or lymphatic system as underlying nutrient solution making up the bulk of the body and providing nourishment to all the tissues. Yoga therapy can help to lighten the body and movement. You can do this through an active vinyasa practice, taking deep breaths with an intention for your overall practice to be with effort.

Introduction

Ayurvedic medicine practiced as an ancient healing system used in India and worldwide. The theory of Ayurveda is based on balancing the individual’s three constitutional doshas (i.e., Pitta, Vata, Kapha). Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are considered such as indiscriminate diet, undesirable habits, not observing rules of healthy living, seasonal abnormalities, lack of movement, misuse of body, mind, and spirit can cause disease. Typically in an Ayurvedic session, there is a diagnosis based on a comprehensive history, detailed physical examination, measurement of vital signs including pulse, and relevant laboratory tests. (Qureshi, 2013)

Yoga Therapy is the process of empowering individuals to progress towards improved health and welling through the application of the teachings and practices of yoga according to IAYT (International Association of Yoga Therapists). A yoga therapist uses tools such as asana/postures, adjustments to movement, pranayama/breath work, meditation, lifestyle and Yama and Niyama to guide the experience. A yoga therapist does not diagnose, medicate, give nutritional advice, massage or do psychotherapy. The process involves an intake, assessment, evaluation, plan and review and uses the Panchamaya Kosha Model of healing which is an ancient model of the human system (i.e., Anamaya Kosha, Pranamaya Kosha, Manomaya Kosha, Vijnanamaya Kosha, Anadamaya Kosha).

Both Yoga and Ayurveda reflect the Vedic idea that we must live according to our unique nature and its particular capacities.

 Characteristics of Dosha

Dosha means “fault, impurity or mistake” which is a bit hard to understand in a yoga and Ayurveda context, therefore, we may think of dosha as an organization. It is important to comprehend that all three doshas are present in everybody and everything. When the doshas are in balance they maintain a harmonious psychophysiology as when they are imbalanced they pollute the bodily tissues which lead to disease. The three doshas Pitta, Vata, Kapha bind the five elements into flesh. Vata is space and air; Pitta is fire and water, Kapha is water and Earth. Each of these doshas has their attributes.

Vata means a vehicle to carry or move. Vata regulates movement from the activity of how many thoughts we have to the efficiency of how our food moves through our digestive track.  Vata tends to have few or no children, delicate in health, irregular appetite and thirst. A vata behavior may be easily excited, easily alert and quick to act without thinking. They have great imaginations, daydream, tend to love someone out of fear of loneliness, do not like sitting idle, seek constant action, make good money, have difficulty saving, faith is flexible, and are ready for a change. (Lad, 2002) When Vata is in a sattvic state, the individual is creative, open-minded, communicates well, is a source of constant inspiration and possess a strong sense of human unity. When Vata is in a rajasic state the individual is very active and running to achieve various goals that change continually, they are restless, easily distracted, talkative, superficial and disruptive. When Vata is in a tamasic state the individual is fearful, goes against the order, easily addicted to things, can be suicidal and cannot be trusted. (Frawley, 1999)

Pitta means heat and to be austere.  Pitta usually has strong appetites and like cold drinks and sweets. Pitta is usually disciplined, leaders, confident, wisdom, like to learn, and can concentrate. At times they are judgmental, critical, and perfectionistic. They like noble professions; make large amounts of money, like expensive items, lower sex drive, moderate strength, medium life span and material wealth. (Lad, 2002) When Pitta is in a sattvic state, the individual shines like the sun, disciplined, discriminating in their thinking and always consider the viewpoint of others, friendly, courageous, natural leaders with strong wills for growth and development. When Pitta is in a rajasic state the individual aims at achievement no matter the means, promote themselves and their agendas, critical, controlling, prone to anger and intolerance and reckless. When Pitta is in a tamasic state the individual is destructive, violent, resentful and hostile in life and takes it out on everyone around them, they do not respect social laws or feelings of others and can be psychopathic.  (Frawley, 1999)

Kapha means water.  Kapha has a steady appetite and thirst with a slow digestion and metabolism which result in weight gain which is hard for them to shed. They like to eat, sit, do nothing and sleep for extended periods of time. They have deep, stable faith, love, compassion, calm, and steady mind. They have good memories, deep melodious voices and monotonous patterns of speech. They make money and tend to save money. (Lad, 2002) When Kapha is in a sattvic state the individual is loving, devoted, faithful, they have a comforting presence, patient, a balance of mind, loyal, forgiving and supportive. When Kapha is in a rajasic state, the individual is dominating, controlling, greedy, materialistic, accumulates wealth and possessions until they are overwhelmed by them. When Kapha is in a tamasic state, the person has different addictions, depressed, incapable of self-reflection, blame, trample over others and is usually overweight and full of toxins. (Frawley, 1999)

How Imbalances Present for each Dosha

Vata attributes are dry, light, cold, rough, subtle, mobile, clear, astringent taste and brownish/blackish colors. Vata imbalances produce fear, anxiety and abnormal movements, however, when in balance it promotes joy, happiness, creativity and flexibility. Vata governs breathing, blinking, muscle, sneezing, elimination, and tissue movement, the pulsation of the heart and all changes in the cytoplasm and cell membranes. (Lad, 2002)

 Kapha attributes are thick, slow/dull, cold, oily, liquid, slimy/smooth, dense, soft, static, sticky/cloudy, hard, gross and a sweet and salty taste, white in color. Kapha imbalances produce attachment, greed, passiveness, apathy, laziness and congestive disorders, however, when in balance it promotes love, strength, peace, longevity, memory retention, calmness, and forgiveness. Kapha forms the body’s structure, organs, provides the cohesion that holds the cells together and supplies the water for all bodily parts and systems; it lubricates joints, moisturizes the skin and maintains immunity. (Lad, 2002)

 Pitta attributes are: hot, sharp, light, liquid, spreading, mobile, oily and sour, pungent and bitter to taste. Pitta imbalances produce anger, hatred, jealousy, and inflammatory disorders; however, when in balance it promotes understanding and intelligence. Pitta governs digestion, vitality, absorption, assimilation, nutrition, metabolism, and body temperature. (Lad, 2002)

 Plan of Care for each Dosha

In teaching a vata individual it is best to use words like calm, slow, steady, grounding, strengthening, and consistent. The goal of a yoga practice would be the removal of stiffness from the joints, steadiness of the muscles, feeling of groundedness, calm and support. If you chose to do sun salutations with this individual, they should be done slowly and consciously.  Pranayama techniques like right nostril breathing, retention after the inhalation and Nadi Shodhana (combination of heating and cooling) are beneficial for this dosha.

The sequence of vata reducing asana practice is designed to build core strength while maintaining their flexibility. Some things to consider when teaching a vata sequence is to do it in the quiet, to hold the standing, sitting, forward bends and twists longer than the client is inclined to do as this longer hold will be a challenge and a reward for an individual in the long run. Surya Namaskar (sun salutations) holding each pose for a breath before moving on, to practicing being conscious of the movement. Adho Mukha Svanasana (or Wall Push), Tadasana (Mountain), Utkatasna (Chair), Trikonasana (Triangle), Virabhadrasana 1 (Warrior 1), Parsvottanasana (Pyramid), Padangushthasana (Gorilla), Navasna (Boat), Prep for Sirsasana (Dolphin), Child’s pose, Legs-Up-the-Wall, Locust, Dandasana (Staff), Pashimottanasana (Seated Forward Fold), and Marichyasana III (Seated Spinal Twist).  (Kozak, 2001) Pala Mudra helps with anxiety relief and can be paired with an affirmation of “At peace within my inner being, I experience a greater sense of security.” and can be held for a couple of breaths or as long as fifteen minutes. (LePage, 2014)

For meditation, corpse poses with knees, ankles, wrists supported, eye pillow, neck roll, folded blanket around the top of the head and covering the ears, and a blanket to cover the whole body. You may even consider a sandbag on the belly. Long mediations for at least twenty minutes are needed to calm the fear and anxiety that is their inherent tendency.  Meditation can help them sleep, alleviate nervous digestion, strengthen their immune system. Mantra and visualizations work well for them.  Visualizations such as earth, water, mountain, ocean, lotus, rose, the light of the sun at dawn can help as well as color therapy of gold and saffron will contribute to clear their mental field. Mantras of RAM, SHRIM, HRIM are ideal for them to use throughout the day if they find themselves losing balance to worry and anxiety. Devotional meditations that a vata might resonate with are Vishnu as the avatar and savior of Rama, Ganesha as grounding, Hanuman power of prana and represents higher vata characteristics. Vata’s are learning to stabilize their inner nature so that the every changing external world does not un-ground them. (Frawley, 1999)

In teaching a pitta individual, it is best to use words like cooling, relaxing, surrendering, forgiving, gentle and diffusive. The goal of a yoga practice would be to feel the coolness, calm, openness, patience, tolerance; reduction of inflammation, and acidity. Rather than doing the sun salutation, the Moon Salutation (Chadra Namaskar) works better for them. Pranayama techniques like shitali and sitkari and left nostril breathing decrease pitta.

The sequence of asana is for pitta reducing and practiced in an effort with ease that is non-goal oriented. Focus on the breath monitoring the level of work intensity. Forward folds and twists are effective in reducing and bringing up pitta. If you are reducing pitta, hold the postures for extended periods of time. Chandra Namaskar (Moon salutations) done at 50-60% of their effort level works well for them, and they will still be working harder than most. Cat Stretch, Locust, Adho Mukha Svanasana, Low Lunge, Padottanasna, (Standing Straddle fFold), Legs up Wall with Pelvis lifted, Child’s pose, Supta Padagusthasna (Hand to Big Toe), Paschimottansana (Seated Forward Fold), SupineTtwist. (Kozak, 2001) Padma Mudra helps to reduce anger and find unconditional love and used with the affirmation of “nurturing the garden of my heart allows for the blossoming of unconditional love.” and can be done at any time for a couple of breaths up to fifteen-minute practice. (LePage, 2014)

 Savasana for fifteen-twenty minutes with a bolster under the knees, wrist, neck and eye pillow and using a strap at the thighs will help release anger, aggression and let go of their willful control approach to life. For meditation helps them concentrate their energy in a positive way toward an inner goal, however, ensure that they do not turn it into another form of achievement. Focus on expanding the mind and heart to reveal truth like waves move across the lake in the moonlight. Use non-fiery images like a mountain forest, lake, ocean, rain clouds, deep blue skies, the moon, and stars. For color therapy use the colors such as white, dark blue or emerald green. Mantras such as SHAM, SHRIM, OM are helpful throughout the day if anger arises for them. Forgiveness prayers and Meta can help them find peace and happiness for themselves and for those that they have harmed from their forceful actions. For devotional practices Lakshmi born of the ocean, Vishnu and Shiva in their forms of water and space, and God. Meditations that focus on the infinite space beyond the limitations of their critical mind is the art of developing discrimination for them. (Frawley, 1999)

In teaching a kapha individual it is best to use words like stimulating, moving, warming, lightning, energizing, and releasing. The goal of a yoga practice would be to normalize the body weight, reduction of congestion, removal of excess fat, mucus, and water from the body, a greater sense of detachment. Sun Salutations can be active and flow.  Pranayama techniques like Bhastrika and Kapalabhati decrease kapha in the body.

The following sequence is to help reduce Kapha.  Their practice should be energetic with a goal to first strengthen shoulders, arms, and legs so they may master the art of inversions. Hold Forward Folds shorter as this can increase kapha.  Surya Namaskar should be strong considering doing seven repetitions to bring up their heart rate. Adho Mukha Savasana (Downward Dog), Tadasana (Mountain), Vrksana (Tree), Trikonasana (Triangle), Virabhadrasana 1 (Warrior 1), Virabhadrasana II (Warrior 2), Prep for Sirsasana (Dolphin), Sarvangasana I (shoulder stand at the wall), Locus, Niralamba Bhujangasana III (Cobra), Navasana (Boat), Supine Spinal Twist. (Kozak, 2001)  Svadhisthana Mudra is helpful with addictions and can bring in self-nourishment qualities. It can pair with an affirmation such as “completely at home at the center of my being, I experience deep nourishment and inner healing.” and can be done for a couple of breaths up to fifteen-minute practice. (LePage 2014)

Savasana should be five to fifteen minutes on the ground in corpse pose to help them release possessiveness and heaviness into a space of consciousness of true happiness and abundance. Meditation for a kapha may take a more disciplined approach as they are most likely to fall asleep, therefore doing more active meditations that include mantra, pranayama and meditation may work better for them. Focus on images that increase the fire, air and either elements like sun, wind moving through trees, an expanse of clear blue sky in colors like gold, blue and orange. Mantras of OM, HUM, AIM are good for stimulating energy for them. For a devotional practice, they may connect with Shiva or the Kali to stimulate them. Devotion should not become a form of self-indulgence but the purity of heart and mind. (Frawley, 1999)

 Discussion

The Vedas relate to an important practice of yoga and Ayurveda, which reflect an approach that comprehends all aspects of life. Yoga is the application of Vedic wisdom for self-realization. Yoga provides the means for purification of the mind (Chitta-shuddhi) to enable us to gain self-realization through Vedanta (self-knowledge).  Ayurveda is a Vedic method for healing and right living.  Ayurveda affords us purification of the body (deha-shuddhi) for optimal health and energy. As you learn the Vedic system and combine the related disciplines, you have a tremendous resource. (Frawley, 1999) In the modern world, you see these practices in integrative medicine. The body of research seems to be growing faster for yoga therapy, but both yoga and Ayurveda face difficulty. The challenge is in conducting randomized control trials because most of the treatments are individualized and targeted to the entire person. Future research may include looking at combining these integrative modalities and collect data with scientific rigor.

 

References

 

Frawley, D. (1999). Yoga & Ayurveda Self-Healing and Self-Realization. Twin Lakes, Wisconsin: Lotus Press.

 

Frawley, D., & Kozak, S. S. (2001). Yoga for your type: an Ayurvedic approach to your Asana practice. Twin Lakes, WI: Lotus.

 

Lad, V. (2002). Textbook of Ayurveda. Albuquerque, NM: Ayurvedic Press.

 

Page, J. L., & Page, L. L. (2014). Mudras for Healing and Transformation (2nd ed.). Sebastopol, CA: Integrative Yoga Therapy.

Qureshi, N. A., & Al-Bedah, A. M. (2013). Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment9, 639–658. http://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S43419

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Yoga | Add Comments Here »


Yogic Principles in Action

In this blog you will learn the Yamas and Niyamas in Sanskrit and English. How each of these principles is applicable in daily life? What role Yamas and Niyamas play in the Scope of Practice and Code of Ethics for professional Yoga therapists? How will the Yamas and Niyamas influence my personal approach to practicing yoga therapy?

The Yamas and Niyamas are foundational to all yogic thought. They are guidelines, ethical disciplines or pieces of wisdom that you can think of as the yoga commandments. This set of guidelines helps us recognize moments of self-deception such as observing what sort of communication style we are using with others. It teaches us tools in which to distinguish between cause and effect or Karma.  Yamas are restraints, disciplines, attitudes and behaviors (like our attitude we have toward things and people “outside us”- our external world). Niyamas are our inner observances and how we relate to ourselves – our self-care.

According to Doug Keller in The Heart of the Yogi there were traditionally ten each of  the Yamas and Niyamas, however for our discussion today we will focus on the main five in each category of the Yamas and Niyamas that are widely used today. The Yamas are the guidelines to help us interact with our external world, our social environments, our relationships and our code of ethics. The Yamas are Ahimsa (non-violence), Satya (truthfulness), Asteya (non-stealing), Brahmacharya (non-excess) and Aparigraha (non-possessiveness). The Niyamas are our code of personal conduct; it is about self-regulation and maintaining a positive environment in which to grow. The Niyamas are Saucha (purity), Santosha (contentment), Tapas (self-discipline), Svadhyaya (self-study) and Ishvara Pranidhana (surrender).

Ahimsa (Sutra 2:35) at its root means finding the courage to maintain compassion towards yourself and others in all situations. When we don’t meet our body “where it is” on the mat that day we are being violent toward our body.  we are no longer listening to the messages that it is trying to send us. Our body speaks our mind; violence and awareness do not coexist. How we treat ourselves is how we treat those around us.  if we are being a task master and critical with ourselves and then feel as though we are being light hearted and forgiving with others we are fooling ourselves. We can’t be critical of ourselves and forgiving with others. If we can’t be emotionally safe and loving with ourselves then others can never feel safe around us. The pop-culture allegory would be like Pigpen in the Peanuts cartoon.  There is always a “cloud of dust” around him.  People can sense this cloud of harm in actions or thoughts. You can’t expect to purchase orange paint at the store and expect it will be yellow at home when you put it on the walls. I believe Ahimsa helps us build bridges with people by being compassionate, loving and patient.  It nourishes our students.  However, this doesn’t mean we should be a door mat. The most compassionate people have boundaries for themselves. Gandhi is just one teacher whose whole life was based on this one principle.

Satya (Sutra 2:36) Patanjali describes it as truthfulness (being honest with ourselves and others). In our practice when we buy a pose by selling Ahimsa and Satya it is too expensive. We do not need to be cafeteria practioners taking only what we are good at and leaving the rest behind or compromising our truth. Our body is ever changing.  We should love it and be honest about where it is that day without apology or excuses about parts of the body that are healing or unflattering. By letting go of our competition with ourselves and others you can let go of your masks by being authentically you (bold, brave, courageous, loving, honest and compassionate). When we are vulnerable it is a language that connects all of us and allows us to be empathic. We can’t just organize our stuff in a closet and close the door forgetting about it because at some point the door bursts out. We are imperfect beings.  Be careful to not confuse truth with ‘brutal honesty’ or compassion with ‘being right’. Love is a higher vibration than truth and should be your guide in directing you on how to use your truth. By not letting the ego get in the way of the heart we can recognize when we are in need of being right rather than the more important issue of the feeling of others. Sharing our knowledge with love, compassion and authenticity feels better than causing harm to others making them feel wrong or “less than.”

Asteya (Sutra 2:37) while it consists of “non-stealing” it is really rooting out the subconscious beliefs of  “lack” and “scarcity” that cause greed and hoarding in various forms.  When we approach our practice from scarcity and hold back thinking that we won’t have enough energy to do the entire practice we are not operating at our full capacity and trusting that we have the required energy to do our practice. If you attain what you want through honest means you will have no fear. Taking time to use objects in the right way, managing our time properly and cultivating a sense of completeness are ways that we can practice Asteya. How often do you steal from yourself? We steal our time of rest and reflection because we see it as a status symbol or self-worth validation. As we allow demands of others and their perceptions to mold our images it steals our own uniqueness. When was the last time you were on an electronic device instead of being present with the person in front of you?

Brahmacharya (Sutra 2:38) is the moderation of sensual pleasures (mental, vocal or physical). What is the perfect limit for us and why do we move into excess? Learning to tame the mind to distinguish the difference between what the body needs to fulfill our health or dharma and what the mind is making up that we need. We are complex beings and many times we fulfill the surface level needs rather than pausing and taking a moment to view what our soul needs for holistic approach to fulfillment. It is neither obsessing nor repressing that satisfies our desires.

Aprigraha (Sutra 2:39) is non-clinging or simplicity. When we take away our stuff (our possessions) and we face ourselves it isn’t always comfortable, but it is a place of inspiration that makes room for growth to come.  When students look at someone else in class and want to be them and they judge their life against their peer, it is creating comparison and jealousy. Rather than the student looking inward and working on their own body in their own capacity, loving and accepting where they are in that movement everyone has a starting point in which they leave denial and start to grow awareness and understanding.  It is okay to have possessions in life as long as we stay connected to our internal self (our soul).  It is when we use the possessions to feed a spiritual starvation that we get off of our path… remaining connected to our inner desire or our soul’s dharma code and allowing life to flow and trust our journey, determining what is enough for us in all dharma roles that we play (such as child, sibling, partner, teammate at work, parent etc. Remember to check in to see how many rocks we are carrying around with us and learning to let go to detach and respect the circle of life.

Shaucha (Sutra 2:40-41) is purity and at the root concerned with keeping different energies distinct and keeping the sanctity of the energy around us. The sage Manu says “Water purifies the body; truthfulness the mind; true knowledge the intellect and the soul is purified by knowledge and austerity.” By keeping an orderly environment, ensuring that our body is cleaned and free of strong body odors… by coming into our practice and lining up with our peers rather than scattered about the room… this allows our energy to flow and keeps the room clean.

Santosha (Sutra 2:42) being content with what we have already attained and wanting what you already have, accepting what is and making the best out of everything. We may not be ready yet for what we are attempting to do and that doesn’t mean we are bad or “less than,” instead accepting we did our best and tomorrow we will show up and do the same. Approach each asana with an effort of ease. This is a practice of gratitude and grace by approaching each obstacle with love over fear. Sometimes we need to remind ourselves of the adage “accept that which we cannot change, change what we can and have the wisdom to know the differences.” Every day I ask for the wisdom to know which question to ask, the ability to be quiet enough to hear the answer, the courage to accept the answer and the boldness to take action without fear.

                        Tapas (Sutra 2:43) is the wiliness to do what is necessary to reach a goal with discipline. I think of this in a personal practice where wise effort can be discerned as the difference between someone who simply fantasizes and someone who is on a path toward their dreams. It takes effort for anything to bear fruit in our physical world yet we need to balance Tapas with Santosha (effort with contentment) If we try to force things we end up doing harm. If we are forcing an asana we are creating gripping muscles and joints versus meeting our body where we need it to be with effort and ease and allowing circulation and health to thrive. Sometimes we have to underwhelm ourselves so that we will build more desire to reach our goal. I am reminded of the story of the Phoenix… of burning off some layers and emerging as something new so that we can fully live our soul’s dharma… our life’s mission.

            Svadhyaya (Sutra 2:44) is the study of one’s self through careful observation. Taking pause during our over stimulated life and finding our breath, relaxing, and feeling, watching and allowing ourselves to just “be.” At these times we can journal and meditate and almost in an organic manner we can start to see our inner wisdom source guide us to our truth. Being aware of our spirit of exploration within and acknowledging the scared power it holds.

Ishvara-Pranidhana (Sutra 2:45) is something bigger than ourselves. It is about showing up in our life, doing our best and leaving the rest up to the higher power that we believe in and allowing our life to create a legacy that is for a higher purpose than ourselves.  Always asking which option will help the most people keeping self-actualizing as the goal in life and adjusting all of our actions to serve this goal in some way. When we allow growth to happen it brings awareness to our being which can then fully express our authenticity of “self” and celebrate this energy.

References

Adele, D. (2009). The Yamas & Niyamas Exploring Yoga’s Ethical Practice (pp. 21-175). Duluth, Minnesota: On-Word Bound Books LLC.

 

Keller, D. (2004). The Yama and Niyamas. In The Heart of the Yogi: The Philosophical World of Hatha Yoga (pp. 141-146). South Riding, Virginia: Do Yoga Productions.

 

Satachidananda, S. (2005). Sadhana Pada Portion on Practice. In The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (11th ed., pp. 131-151). Buckingham, Virginia: Integral Yoga Publications.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in selfie | Add Comments Here »