Restorative Yoga Practice Journal

For my practice, I chose to do revolving knee squeeze pose (Parivrtta Pavanmuktasana, both sides), restorative plow, supine tadasana with strap. I did each of these poses for fifteen minutes each from February 13th to the 20th with a five-minute sprint journal at the end of every practice.  In revolving knee squeeze pose, I used one square bolster and two blankets (one between the knees and one to cover the body). In restorative plow I used one square bolster under the sacrum, a folded blanket on the belly (between belly and thigh) and a yoga strap around the feet to draw the legs overhead slightly. In Tadasana, I was supine on the floor with two blankets under my legs and a long strap that went from the waist to the feet ( strap crossed once). All poses chosen were grounding restorative poses.

Annamaya Kosha: I noticed that it was harder to twist my body to the right in revolving knee squeeze pose. As I turned to the left in revolving knee squeeze pose, I felt at ease and by body seemed to cool in time. In restorative plow physically it is hard to get the belly blanket in the hip crease over the belly, it takes a little coordination. In tadasana at first, I would feel the tension in my lower legs to feet, which were hard to manage. At the end of the practice, my belly was smaller (plow), I felt less bloating (twist), and my legs felt light.

Pranamaya Kosha: When I turned right in revolving knee squeeze pose my breath quickened and was shallow, yet I was not in any physical pain and as I twisted left my breath was full and smooth.  The twist worked on balancing all of my prana vayus. My breath in restorative plow was quiet and moved laterally in my body. Halasana balanced udana, prana, and samana energy while cooling the body. Smooth full three-dimensional breath in tadasana. Tadasana was balancing my Prana and Apana energy.  It was interesting for me to explore how my breath could change rapidly between poses. I contribute the right twist breath quickening to the stuck facet joint on this side. Apparently, I need this type of twist in my practice, therefore I have switched to this one in my personal practice.

Manomaya Kosha: As I twisted right in revolving knee squeeze pose I felt very anxious, and as I turned left I relaxed to the point of sleepiness. I was able to witness my thoughts in restorative plow. The mind would start off busy and slowly reach a more relaxed state. It took a lot of negotiation with my nervous system to allow the tension in my lower extremities to let go and be supported by the strap and blankets.

Vijnanamaya Kosha: I was able to witness the opposites in my life here in all poses. For example, in supine Tadasana, I was able to witness that my vata element is out of balance and that the grounding of my feet and legs with the wall, strap, and blankets supporting me gave me a felt sense of grounding and support. This grounding in turn also calmed my pita qualities as the release of strain and added effort left my legs, allowing me to feel relaxed. While I was in Tadasana, I did a loving kindness meditation as well.  During revolving knee squeeze twist, I was able to focus on calming my vata tendencies by grounding down into the bolster and my pitta tendencies by surrendering into the sensations of my physical body. By the time I made it to the other side I had relaxed the torso.  In restorative plow it would take a moment for the mind to integrate within the pose however with discipline and breath awareness, I was able to negotiate a sense of deep relaxation within my mind and nervous system.

Anandamaya Kosha: In Tadasana, I was able to feel a place of steadiness and security. I felt supported by the stability of this pose and was able to attune to the natural joy that I experience from my real self. In revolving knee squeeze twist, I was able to see as I rested into the pose, there was an expansion of my inner self. In restorative halasana (also known as three, two, one pose) once I integrated my body, mind, and spirit with this pose it was very cooling and soothing as I felt a deep sense of peace.

Overall this practice allowed me to witness my thoughts, to experience my need for support and grounding. Each practice was a gift and a journey into my inner sanctuary self and stillness of consciousness. My lesson was, as I develop calmness and security, my witness of consciousness will grow. I am worth slowing down and making time for my needs on this journey, such as writing a book, increasing my speaking engagements, developing yoga teacher training, exploring my hypotheses in research arena and creating my video content.

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